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Archive for the ‘Revisiting A Theme’ Category

“Untitled” (pen & ink) © Susan Sorrell Hill

So…It’s Summer. It’s HOT. Why not a cool little monster blast from the past…? This one was a self-promo postcard from my freelance graphic artist days, circa 1993. The fellow on the left later became an oil painting, the dragon in the center became a bas relief sculpture, and the rock star on the right became a textile design for fabric. Hope you enjoy these critters! (The Illustration Friday word of the week is funk.)

“Untitled” (pen & ink)

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“Untitled” (watercolor, pen & ink) © Susan Sorrell Hill

You might know, if you’ve followed my work for a while, that before I worked in watercolor, I was an oil painter. A mid-life crisis brought me face to face with the realization that there were things I wanted to do (books) and mediums I wanted to go deeper into (drawing and watercolor) and that there was only so much time left.

I leapt.

But then (and this, I think, is one of the hazards of not working steadily) amongst all of the other chaos happening in my life over the last few years, I found myself back on the fence: watercolor or oils…watercolor or oils? A reasonable person might simply say, “Do both.” or, “It’s a no-brainer…oil is the medium of The Old Masters, and besides, oils sell for far more.” Or, “Choose and get on with it, damnit!”

But the best reasons and arguments haven’t been able to tear me away from my love affair with watercolor and drawing. My own brain and sense of responsibility has been my worst enemy. And a pros and cons list only tells me that the right decision (logically) is the wrong decision for me. Alas.

I’ve wasted a lot of time wrestling with this, and for a person who normally likes to know who I am and where I’m going, it’s been a particular kind of Hell. Truly. The only answer that keeps feeling right is, “Follow your heart. You’re not in Kansas anymore, Dorothy.”

“Untitled” (watercolor, pen & ink) About this painting: it’s a sketch on a scrap of watercolor paper, from a possible imagined story. No, it’s nothing to do with anti-this or pro-that. It’s not political, it’s not taking a stand for anything except the joy of “taking a line for a walk.” Please don’t post political comments. They will be deleted.

 

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© Susan Sorrell Hill

The Illustration Friday word of the week is “giant.”

It’s been a while since I participated in Illustration Friday’s weekly challenge, but this image seemed just about perfect for this week’s fun prompt. (If you’ve got a good memory, you’ll remember that I used this image for another post a long while back.)

Isn’t it curious that we have so many adjectives in our language that describe the relative ‘size’ of things? In our human hard wiring, SIZE must matter! I mean, consider the need for precision in relating the relative threat to our ancestors of, say, a pterodactyl vs a mere turkey vulture…

Of course, a giant (as a noun usage of the word) can also be a creature unto itself, as so many myths and fairy tales can attest.  🙂

“In-Danger Species Meets King Kong” (pen & ink — sorry, no prints currently available of this one…but do visit The Print Collection gallery on my website for other curious images: www.susansorrellhill.com)

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© Susan Sorrell Hill

© Susan Sorrell Hill

More Holiday wishes…

 

SusanH“Untitled”    (pen & ink, colored inks)

More illustration from the archives, this one done as a holiday promotion for a print shop, circa 1985.

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© Susan Sorrell Hill

© Susan Sorrell Hill

Happy Holidays, dear readers!

SusanH“The Twelve Days of Christmas”   (pen & ink)

Another one of my vintage graphic designs, circa 1985…a poster border for a musical event, if memory serves.

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“Untitled” c. Susan Sorrell Hill

Watercolor is the Queen of Fluidity.

She presents herself in many guises and can be used in almost infinite ways: tight, loose, transparent, opaque, detailed or glorious washy expanse. When an artist makes a commitment to watercolor, she is really in for it, because watercolor, by her nature, is not totally controllable. Not like oil or acrylic. Sometimes she (the painter) (more…)

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Artists often develop what might be called ‘a visual language.’ They become known for recognizable (but still often mysterious) symbols, and many also revisit ideas and subjects that continue to hold challenge and fascination. (more…)

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